Water and Solid Waste Management

Desired Future

The water resources in Rossland provide a dependable supply of clean, healthy water that exceeds quality requirements and meets the needs of residents, and visitors. Residents are active water custodians. Both the water and wastewater systems are sustainably managed to meet the needs of a growing community. Competing uses are balanced and natural hydrological systems as closely mimicked to meet natural ecosystem needs. Rossland is a leader in minimizing waste and maximizing recycling and reuse of resources and materials. Residents and businesses conserve resources in their daily activities.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: Existing reservoirs provide water of sufficient quality and quantity to service the needs of the town, and all activity occurring within the water supply catchment areas is undertaken in an environmentally sensitive manner that gives the highest priority to protecting water supplies and water quality.

End-state Goal 2: The water, wastewater and storm water systems adequately service residents, visitors and businesses and meet basic needs in a reliable, efficient, affordable and equitable manner.

End-state Goal 3: Potable water provision, storm water management and flood control measures are designed to maintain the integrity of streams, rivers, lakes, riparian areas and wetlands, while adequately servicing residents in a reliable, efficient and affordable manner.

End-state Goal 4: Water users are responsible citizens who conserve potable water and reserve the highest quality water for the uses demanding such quality.

End-state Goal 5: Recycling, reuse and reduction of materials has eliminated the need for a landfill and created local employment opportunities. 

 

Amount of Water Used (WW-1)

What are we measuring?

The estimated average daily domestic (residential) water use per capita served with municipal water

Why are we measuring it?

Rate of water consumption addresses both the sustainability-oriented conservation of natural resources and the reality that Rossland’s infrastructure is aging.  This indicator is in part reflective of End-state Goal #4 which states that water users are responsible citizens who conserve potable water and reserve the highest quality water for the uses demanding such quality.
Until all homes are metered, it is most accurate to report water usage from reservoir minus commercial water use. When community-wide meters have been installed, it will be possible to isolate most commercial water use. Red Mountain is metered separately from the rest of the community. Per capita calculations, however, will be skewed slightly by homes that are not occupied by “usual” residents included in the Census population estimates, and by homes that rely on well water.

How are we doing?

Over the last six years from 2004 to 2009, Rossland has utilized on average 878,355 cubic metres of water per year with a range of 815,903 in 2005 to 919,542 in 2007. Water consumption in Rossland remains stable for most of the year at about 2000 cubic metres per day, and then rises to 3500 to 5500 cubic metres per day in July and August.

Rossland’s water usage is high compared to other jurisdictions. Subtracting out an estimate for commercial water use, flow volumes from Rossland’s treatment plant suggest that from 2004 to 2009 average domestic use ranged from 394 to 550 litres per capita per day (lcd). This exceeds the national domestic use average of 329 lcd and the average domestic use of Europeans which ranges from 150 to 200 lcd. Nevertheless, Fernie’s per capita water consumption was 1,640 lcd in 2009. This is considered to be mostly as a result of leakage, but nonetheless provides a benchmark for another mountain community.

In the future, we will be able to refine this information using data from residential and commercial water meters.

 

Amount of Water Used 2004-2009
 

Total City Water Use

(cubic metres/year)

Per Capita Domestic Water Use

(litres/day)

2004

835,100

408.42

2005

815,903

394.00

2006

903,967

536.94

2007

919,542

549.96

2008

882,126

518.68

2009

913,492

489.99

Data Sources

City of Rossland
 

Reservoir Levels (WW-2)

What are we measuring?

Annual number of days either or both reservoirs are below full capacity

Why are we measuring it?

Reservoir levels will reflect Rossland’s current ability to meet the City’s water needs and reflects in part our progress towards End-state Goal #1: Existing reservoirs provide water of sufficient quality and quantity to service the needs of the town, and all activity occurring within the water supply catchment areas is undertaken in an environmentally sensitive manner that gives the highest priority to protecting water supplies and water quality.   

How are we doing?

Currently, Rossland has only baseline data for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Star Gulch was 100% full or overflowing for all but nine days (mid July) in 2009. Ophir reservoir was still being commissioned and levels fluctuated due to operational issues rather than water demand or drought.

Data Sources

City of Rossland

Solid Waste (WW-3)

 

What are we measuring?

Per capita annual solid waste

Why are we measuring it?

Waste reduction is integral to Rossland’s sustainable future and a reduction in waste indirectly tracks Rossland’s progress toward End-state Goal #5: Recycling, reuse and reduction of materials has eliminated the need for a landfill and created local employment opportunities.  

Rossland residents are required to purchase special garbage bags to place their waste in for pick up. Currently the City is unable to track the weight of solid waste or the number of garbage bags collected. Until those numbers are available, the number of garbage bags sold will be used as indicator of the amount of garbage produced by Rossland.

How are we doing?

The number garbage bags sold in Rossland has increased from 2007 to 2009. Per capita garbage sold has increased from 8.6 large bags and 2.1 small bags per person in 2007 to 10 large bags and 3.2 small bags per person in 2009. This may in part be due to the removal of the self drop-off station. Although it appears that Rossland is producing more garbage, this collection system is relatively new and thus a few more years of data are required to observe a clear trend.  

 

Number of garbage bags sold per year in the City of Rossland

Year

Number of Large Bags

Number of Small Bags

Large Bags/person

Small Bags/person

2007

28540

7060

8.6

2.1

2008

33120

11200

9.5

3.2

2009

35250

11180

10

3.2

Data Sources  

Davies Sales and Service