Natural Environment and Resource Lands

Desired Future

Rossland’s spectacular setting in the alpine environment gives the community its unique character. Designated and protected green spaces, green corridors, riparian areas, and natural ecosystems allow indigenous flora and fauna to thrive. The built environment is also integrated into the natural environment though native tree plantings and ‘ribbons’ of green traversing the city and along stream corridors. In addition, community gardens have been established, providing potential sites for growing local produce.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: An extensive network of green spaces, natural habitat, environmentally sensitive areas, riparian zones, water catchment areas, and wildlife corridors is protected.

End-state Goal 2: Areas with exceptional productive capacity for agriculture or silviculture are protected from urban development and managed to maintain or enhance the health and biodiversity of surrounding natural systems.

End-state Goal 3: Over time, the built environment is integrated into the natural environment in a way that capitalizes on ecological functions and avoids or manages risks associated with natural hazards.
 

Area of Protected Land and Parks (NE-1)

What are we measuring?

Area of land protected from development or other potentially damaging activities

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator directly reflects End-state Goal #1, which sets a goal of protecting an extensive network of green spaces, natural habitat, environmentally sensitive areas, riparian zones, water catchment areas and wildlife corridors. Protected areas are intended ensure adequate ecosystem functioning and protect biodiversity. They also provide residents much valued opportunities to observe and interact with nature. City-owned parks must be viewed in a slightly different manner than other protected areas. These parks serve a variety of essential purposes, which do not necessarily include conservation. These purposes include the provision of recreation opportunities and green space.

How are we doing?

Rossland currently has only baseline information for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Protected areas and parks in Rossland (based on the Official Community Plan designation Parks, Trails and Open Space) total 167.22 ha, an additional 260.87 ha are zoned Parks and Open Space.  However there is an overlap between these two zones of 34.05 and some portions of the 13.94 ha of City owned parks fall into these two zones.  Accounting for the overlaps, Rossland has:
 
  • 120.55 ha as OCP Protected Areas and Parks (PTOS)
  • 213.25 ha as Parks and Open Space Zoning (P2)
  • 34.03 ha as the Overlap of these two Protected Areas (P2 and PTOS)
  • 13.94 ha as City Parks
 
In total Rossland has 381.77 ha of Protected Areas within the City Area and 6.8% of the City Area is protected. By contrast, the City of Fernie had 49 ha of protected areas within its jurisdiction, although protected area in the Greater Fernie Area is much higher.
 
In addition, Rossland has 24.62 ha in the Trail Creek Development Permit Area as highlighted on the map for this indicator.  This is a 60 m buffer around Trail Creek (30 m on either side of the creek) with special development restrictions.  The purpose is not to prevent development but to protect the sensitive areas along the creek when development occurs.  This area is not included in the 'protected areas' calculation.  Looking to the future, the City is in the process of finalizing the parkland dedication from Redstone. The total area for the expected additional parklands in Redstone is 5.64 ha.
 
Rossland is moving toward its goal of protecting an extensive network of green spaces, natural habitat, environmentally sensitive areas, riparian zones, water catchment areas, and wildlife corridors.
 

Data Sources

City of Rossland

 

Rural Stream Water Quality (NE-2)

What are we measuring?

Levels of E.Coli and turbidity

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator does not directly measure the achievement of one of the End-state Goals, but is nonetheless a critical indicator of the broad health of Rossland’s Natural Environment and Resource Lands. Three major Rossland streams (Topping Creek, Hannah Creek and Murphy Creek) are currently tested for E.Coli and turbidity, in addition to 41 other general water quality parameters, microbes and metals. Changes in these parameters may indicate that human activity in the watershed is impacting the environment. In 2008, all three streams were assessed to establish baseline data. Each stream will now be assessed once every three years on a rotating basis.

How are we doing?

Rossland currently has only baseline information for Murphy Creek and Hannah Creek. Between 2008 and 2009, levels of E.Coli in Topping Creek increased from 2 CFU/100ml to 7 CFU/100m. Chlorination and filtration removes the E.Coli and turbidity and provides treated water that meets Interior Health Authority requirements and Canadian Drinking Water Standards. The BC provincial standards for E.Coli in raw drinking water that receives chlorination and filtration are that E.Coli must not exceed 100 CFU/100ml in 90% of samples taken in a 30 day period.
 
With this limited data, it is not possible to say if Rossland is moving toward or away from its End-state Goals and Desired Future.

 

Topping Creek
(2008)

Murphy Creek
(2008)

Hannah Creek

(2008)

Topping Creek

(2009)

E.Coli
CFU/100ml

2

1

1

7

Turbidity
NTU

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

Data Sources

City of Rossland