Land Management

Desired Future

The town is centred on a compact and vibrant downtown core, connected by trails and green corridors to development at the base of Red Mountain, Redstone Alpine Golf Resort and to new developments. A diverse range of residential and tourist accommodation exists that satisfy the needs of residents and visitors. Buildings and infrastructure are designed and restored in ways that use resources responsibly, and that compliment the natural environment, heritage and overall aesthetic of the town. The downtown core is thriving and the restored heritage character attracts visitors to Rossland.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: The built environment is designed to make efficient use of land resources and limit sprawling development.

End-state Goal 2: The community contains a wide diversity of housing types, shops, services and employment opportunities, and is as complete a community as possible for a city of its size.

End-state Goal 3: The built environment is integrated with the natural features.

End-state Goal 4: Commercial developments, including resort-related enterprises and new industry, are located and operated in ways that are compatible with the community’s social fabric, high quality of life, and environment.

End-state Goal 5: A vibrant downtown remains the commercial, cultural, and social focal point of the community.

End-state Goal 6: Development is undertaken in ways that enhance both the economy and the environment.

 

 

Dwelling Density (LM-1) 

What are we measuring?

Density of accommodation type (residential, tourist/visitor residential, second homes, etc.) on land that is serviced and zoned for residential development

Why are we measuring it?

To varying degrees, this indicator addresses the End-state Goals of making efficient use of land resources and limiting sprawl (End-state Goal #1), and maintaining a vibrant downtown as the commercial, cultural and social focal point of the community (End-state Goal # 6). Increased density is a common measure of sustainability in planning and can lower the expense of infrastructure and property taxes, enhance the viability of public transit, and, assuming high occupancy, is associated with community vibrancy. This indicator also captures infill and the addition of legal secondary suites.

How are we doing?

Currently, Rossland has only baseline data for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Dwelling density was calculated by dividing the number of units by the area of the indicated zones. A housing unit is a single residence, either a single family home or a suite in a multifamily dwelling.

In the Rossland core, the dwelling density is 8.57 housing units per hectare. In the past three years, Rossland has made several bylaw amendments that could potentially increase density by facilitating the creation of secondary suites, duplexes and the creation of infill housing on smaller lots. The number of building permits and housing starts are reported in both Community Economic Development and Housing and Affordability.

While we do not have adequate data to depict trends, based on the recent planning changes, Rossland is moving slowly towards its goal of efficient land use that limits sprawl.

Dwelling density by zone type (units/hectare)
  Rossland Core* Rural Residential Rossland Core** Redstone and Red Mountain Base Area***

Housing Units Per Hectare

8.57
0.17
1.09

*Combination R1, R1 SS, R1 GH, R1-S, R1B/B, R MH, C1, C2, C3, CD4, CD5, CD6, CD8, CD9, R2, R3, R3i, CD4 (single family, secondary suite, multifamily, commercial - mostly within Rossland core)
**RRa & RRb (rural residential -perimeter of Rossland core)
***Combination of R4, R5, RM6, CD1-LDR1, MFR1, AVC1, AVC2, AVC3, AVC4, CD2-GW1, GW2, LDGW, CD3-RFA1, RFA2, CD7, CD10 (single family residential, resort, multifamily, etc. - mostly Redstone, Red Mountain base area)

Data Sources

City of Rossland

 

Diversity of Total Housing Stock (LM-2)

What are we measuring?

The proportion of housing stock by type (single family, homes with registered secondary suites and multi-family dwellings)
Why are we measuring it?

A variety of accommodation types are required to meet the needs of a diverse community. End-state Goal #2 sets a target that Rossland contain a wide diversity of housing types, shops, services and employment opportunities, and is as complete a community as possible for a city of its size. This indicator directly reflects Rossland’s recognition of the importance of providing a diversity of housing options. Secondary suites that are not registered with the City of Rossland are not included in the indicator. This indicator is repeated in the Housing and Affordability Focus Area (HA-1) as it relates to the End-state Goals for that area.

How are we doing?

Rossland has only baseline data for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Currently, single family dwellings account for 77% of the housing units in Rossland. Of these single family dwellings, there are eight homes with registered secondary suites and 34 mobile homes. In BC, single family dwellings accounted for 49% of the total housing stock, and in Fernie, they accounted for 63%.

Multifamily dwellings account for 23% of the housing units in Rossland. Data are not currently available to distinguish between duplexes, row houses and apartments. The number of units in each multifamily building is utilized as a proxy for this in the table below. Several of the larger multifamily buildings are condos at the base of the ski hill that are rented out as tourist accommodation during the ski season. Dedicated seniors housing accounts for 43 units of the multifamily dwellings, comprising 2% of the total housing stock.

While we do not have adequate data to analyze trends, the recent changes to Rossland bylaws may facilitate the creation of more homes with secondary suites and smaller multifamily developments. Rossland is moving slowly towards its goal of providing a diversity of housing options.

 

Category

Number of Units

Percent

Single Family

1405

77%

Single Family with Registered Secondary Suites

7

<.5%

Mobile Homes

34

 

Multifamily

424

23%

Buidings with 2 units

11

 

Buildings with 3-5 units

13

 

Buildings with 7-20 units

13

 

Buildings with >20 units

6

 

Total Residences

1829

 

Diversity of housing units in Rossland in 2010

Data Sources

City of Rossland