Governance

Desired Future

Governance in Rossland is democratic, responsive, accountable, transparent and actively engages stakeholders and residents in collaborative decision-making processes. Planning and decision-making align with the community’s values and sustainability objectives. Rossland participates in local and regional government networks that exchange knowledge and resources and collaborate to meet shared objectives through efficient regional governance.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: The governance processes are democratic, progressive, and efficient and decision-makers meaningfully engage stakeholders through a broad range of alternatives in transparent decision-making processes on all major civic initiatives.   

End-state Goal 2: Decision-making occurs within the larger context and framework of the community’s Strategic Sustainability Plan, with consideration given to community values, long-term consequences, and anticipated changes to regional and global conditions.

End-state Goal 3: Participation and collaboration with neighbouring communities is part of an effective regional system of governance geared towards meeting and supporting shared objectives.

End-state Goal 4: Civic buildings and community facilities provide spaces conducive to enjoyable and creative community discussion and citizen interaction.

 

Voter Turnout (G-1)

Voter participation in municipal elections 2009

What are we measuring?

Percent of registered voters participating in municipal elections

Why are we measuring it?

Voter turnout is considered a basic indicator of constituent engagement. Although it does not tell a story unto itself, it is a key part of the puzzle.  It is in part indicative of Rossland’s movement towards End-state Goal #1: The governance processes are democratic, progressive, and efficient and decision-makers meaningfully engage stakeholders through a broad range of alternatives in transparent decision-making processes on all major civic initiatives.

How are we doing?

Voter turnout in Rossland in the 2008 Municipal Election was 49%. This is substantially higher than the provincial average of 27% and the Trail turnout of 25%. Many other small British Columbia communities however, had comparable voter participation. Rossland participation has declined over 11% since the 2002 Municipal elections.
Voter-turnout suggests that Rossland is currently moving away from its goal of increasing community engagement in governance.

Voter participation in Rossland municipal elections 2002, 2005, 2008

Year

Percent Voter Participation in Rossland Municipal Elections

2002

60.5%

2005

55.0%

2008

49.0%

Data Sources  

City of Rossland data: City of Rossland

Other Municipalities and Provincial data: Civic Info

 

Satisfaction with Decision Input (G-2)

Satisfaction with Input into City Hall Decisions in 2011

What are we measuring?

Community members’ level of satisfaction with opportunities for input into City Hall decisions and activities

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator measures progress towards the achievement of End-state Goal #1 in which governance processes are democratic, progressive, and efficient and decision-makers meaningfully engage stakeholders through a broad range of alternatives in transparent decision-making processes.

How are we doing?

In total, 60% of Rosslanders had some level of satisfaction with their opportunities for input into decision-making in 2011. However only 21% of respondents were very satisfied with their opportunities for input into decision-making, while 39% were somewhat satisfied.

Satisfaction with opportunities for input into decisions was fairly stable across gender with women tending to be slightly more satisfied than men, who tended to be neither satisfied, nor dissatisfied.

The percentage of individuals very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with opportunities for input into City Hall decisions tended to be stable over age groups for all age groups over 25. Individuals age 45 to 54 expressed the highest degree of satisfaction with opportunities for input into City Hall decisions.

Individuals chose many ways to become involved in City Hall decisions. However while many have read about City Hall decisions (90%), only 49% have attended an open house, 48% have spoken to a Councillor, 26% have attended a Council meeting and 15% have written a letter to the City.

 

Approach

Percent of Individuals Employing Approach

Signing a Petition

58%

Attending an Open House

49%

Talking to a Councillor

48%

Writing a Letter to the Editor

9%

Attending a Council Meeting

26%

Writing a Letter to the City

15%

Approaches to Participating in City Hall Decisions in 2011

Common themes in the comments suggested that some residents felt that there is no point in trying to provide input as City Hall will disregard the input. However others countered that there are multiple opportunities for input into City Hall decisions and activities and that it is the responsibility of residents to take advantage of them.

This is baseline data. In future iterations of the State of Rossland report in which a survey is undertaken, we should be able to report on trends for this indicator.

Data Sources  

State of Rossland Survey

Satisfaction with Information Quality (G-3)

Satisfaction with Accuracy of Information from City Hall by Age Group in 2011

What are we measuring?

Community members’ level of satisfaction with the accuracy, timeliness and completeness of reported information regarding City Hall decisions and activities

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator measures progress towards the achievement of End-state Goal #1 in which governance processes are democratic, progressive, and efficient and decision-makers meaningfully engage stakeholders through a broad range of alternatives in transparent decision-making processes.

How are we doing?

Satisfaction with the timeliness, completeness and accuracy of information from City Hall tend to be linked with the same patterns of responses for all three across gender and age groups. Overall, only 22% of Rosslanders rate themselves as being very satisfied with the timeliness, completeness and accuracy of information from City Hall, while 39% are somewhat satisfied with the timeliness and completeness of information from City Hall and only 33% are somewhat satisfied with the accuracy of information from City Hall. A large portion of respondents (between 25 and 27%) were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the information from City Hall.

 

 

Very Satisfied

Somewhat Satisfied

Neither Satisfied nor Dissatisfied

Somewhat Dissatisfied

Very Dissatisfied

Accuracy of Information

22%

39%

27%

5%

2%

Timeliness of Information

21%

39%

25%

8%

1%

Completeness of Information

21%

33%

26%

10%

3%

Satisfaction with the Accuracy, Timeliness and Completeness of information from City Hall in 2011

There were few gender differences among the responses. Men and women are equally likely to be very satisfied with the timeliness, completeness and accuracy of the information from City Hall. However women are slightly more likely to express that they are somewhat satisfied or neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, while men are more likely to indicate that they are somewhat dissatisfied with the timeliness, completeness and accuracy of the information from City Hall.

Across age groups, respondents under 44 were more likely to indicate that they were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the timeliness, accuracy and completeness of information from City Hall, while those over 44 were more likely to indicate that they are somewhat satisfied with information from City Hall. Individuals in the 45 to 54 age group are mostly likely to be very satisfied with the timeliness, accuracy and completeness of information from City Hall.

Very few individuals expressed strong dissatisfaction with the information from City Hall (3%). Common themes in the comments were that the information is available for those that want to access it. However concerns were expressed that residents have no way of knowing what information is not being communicated.  

This is baseline data. In future iterations of the State of Rossland report in which a survey is undertaken, we should be able to report on trends for this indicator.

Data Sources  

State of Rossland Survey