Community Economic Development

Desired Future

Rossland’s traditional natural resource economy has become increasingly value-added and exists alongside a year-round tourism and knowledge-based sector. Through collaborative actions across the wider region, residents have the capacity to find or create work opportunities and incomes to support sustainable lifestyles. The community works together to support local businesses and to encourage innovation, new businesses, and an entrepreneurial spirit. A diverse, resilient, and vibrant economic base is supported by state-of-the art information and communication technology (ICT) systems. ICT enables a significant number of residents to work from home or to expand their business through virtual networks. Sustainable business practices ensure the continued liveability of the region and contribute to the long-term survival and profitability of the business sector.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: A diverse and balanced economic base provides quality employment and sustainable wages for residents.

End-state Goal 2: A year-round tourism economy exists alongside a broad range of value-added industries.

End-state Goal 3: World-class information and communications technology allows Rossland to attract, retain, and support an elite group of entrepreneurs and professionals who work remotely.   

End-state Goal 4: Growth and renewal is generated by local trades, supporting a stable and skilled workforce.

End-state Goal 5: Sustainable businesses, of appropriate size and type, locate in Rossland where they contribute to a strong local economy.  

End-state Goal 6: The community’s traditional entrepreneurial spirit, and innovative educational and training programs generate ongoing employment opportunities for youth and new residents.   

End-state Goal 7: Heritage, arts and culture are pillar industries that provide stable and diverse revenue sources.

End-state Goal 8: The City works with businesses to support access to local products.

 

Building Permits and Starts (ED-1)

What are we measuring?

The value and number of residential, non-residential and visitor accommodation building permits per year by type, and the number of housing starts

Why are we measuring it?

Building permits and starts are indicators of the level of economic activity.  This indicator reflects several of the End-state Goals for Community Economic Development, including goals of having a year-round tourism economy alongside a broad range of value-added industries (End-state Goal #2), and growth and renewal generated by local trades, supporting a stable and skilled workforce (End-state Goal #4). This indicator is repeated in Housing and Affordability (HA-2) as it also relates directly to the End-state Goals for that Focus Area.

How are we doing?

Rossland currently has only baseline information for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Of the 84 residential permits issued in 2009, there were a total of 8 Housing Starts (this refers to buildings not individual units and includes mobile homes) in the City. These housing starts accounted for approximately 45% of the value of the 86 total building permits that were issued in 2009. Only one permit noted the inclusion of a secondary suite. During this time, only two non-residential building permits were issued and there were no visitor accommodation building permits issued.
 
The total value of the building permits issued in 2009 was $6,163,822.00.
 
Without the necessary data to report trends, it is not possible to say if Rossland is moving toward its Vision for 2030.
Number and value of building permits and housing starts in Rossland in 2009

Type

Number

Value

Non-Residential Permits

2

$64,500

Residential Permits

84

$6,099,322

Single family/Duplex Residential Permits

83

$5,236,322

Multifamily Residential Permits

1

$863,00

Housing Starts

8

$2,803,337

Visitor Accommodation Permits

0

-

Total Permits

86

$6,163,822

Data Sources  

City of Rossland
 

Proportion of Labour Force Living and Working within Rossland (ED-2)

Location of workplace of Rossland residents by proportion of labour force as reported in 2006 Census

What are we measuring?

The percent of full time Rossland residents who are in the labour force and stay in Rossland to work

Why are we measuring it?

This measure is indicative of how successful Rossland is at providing opportunities for people to live and work, and is directly related to End-state Goal #1: A diverse and balanced economic base provides quality employment and sustainable wages for residents.
 
This indicator, while informative, should be interpreted with care.  For example, one should consider the type and quality of jobs available in Rossland. Likewise, this indicator can be misleading if, for example, there is a significant out-migration of workers who relocate closer to their place of work. This type of exodus would result in a higher proportion of Rossland residents living and working in Rossland, but this change would not be a direct result of increased local employment opportunities.

How are we doing?

Rossland currently has only baseline information for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. According to the 2006 Census, approximately 30% of employed Rossland’s residents work within the City and 49% work within the regional district (but outside of Rossland). This is far below the provincial average of 47% of employed residents who work within their municipality of residence and also far below a number of other small communities in the Kootenays.
Without the necessary data to report trends, it is not possible to say if Rossland is moving toward its Vision for 2030.

Location of workplace of Rossland residents by proportion of labour force as reported in 2006 Census

Percent employed workforce working in the census subdivision (municipality) that they live in as reported in 2006 Census

 

Workforce Proportion

Rossland

29%

Trail

75%

Fernie

70%

Invermere

69%

British Columbia

47%

Data Sources

Statistics Canada http://www.statcan.gc.ca/
 

New Business Licenses (ED-3)

What are we measuring?

Number of renewed and new business
licenses per year for the City of Rossland

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator is directly linked to the end-state goal that the community’s traditional entrepreneurial spirit, and innovative educational and training programs generate ongoing employment opportunities for youth and new residents (End-state Goal #6) and provides a measure of both entrepreneurial activity and economic activity.

How are we doing?

From 2005 to 2010, the total number of business licenses issued annually in Rossland, including new licenses and renewals, grew from 90 to 201.  The number of new business licenses taken out in one year peaked in 2006 at 44. This trend of stability with slow growth continued in 2010. In total, 201 business licenses were taken out in 2010 including 21 new business licenses.
 
Based on this data, Rossland is moving towards its Desired Future and End-state Goals for Community Economic Development in 2030, both of which emphasize entrepreneurial activity.  
 
Please note that the inconsistencies between the 2006 and 2007 numbers (that there were slightly more business licenses renewed in 2007 than were taken out in 2006) are likely due to reactivated licenses.

Data Sources  

City of Rossland