Indicator Results

This section contains the 2010 data for the 32 State of Rossland indicators.  The indicators included Context indicators and indicators for the 11 Strategic Sustainability Plan Focus Areas.

Context

This set of Context indicators provides key information that is integral to interpreting the Focus Area Indicators.

Total Permanent Population and Growth Rate (C-1)

What are we measuring?

The total number of permanent residents, by age group, for males and females

Why are we measuring it?

Currently, the most accurate population estimates available for Rossland are the 2009 BC Stats corrected Census estimates. These corrected estimates take into account the 2006 Census undercount, the local number of BC Medical registrations and the number of electric service provider accounts.

How are we doing?

Rossland’s estimated population and change from 2001 to 2009

In 2009, BC Stats estimated Rossland’s population to be 3,532. This is an 8% increase from the 2006 estimate of 3,278. The provincial increase during this period was 5%. Rossland’s population has still not recovered to its 2001 level of 3,649.  Note that many other municipalities experienced a decline in population over the same time period as Rossland and a similar subsequent upturn.

Population and rates of change from 2001 to 2009
Region 2001 2008 2009

Rate of Change
(2001-2008)

Rate of Change
(2008-2009)
Rossland 3,649 3,278 3,532 -10% 8%
British Columbia 4,076,264 4,243,580 4,455,207 4% 5%
Kootenay-Boundary 32,094 30,826 32,111 -4% 4%
Trail 7,619 7,248 7,353 -5% 1%
Fernie 4,706 4,289 4,415 -9% 3%
Invermere 2,877 3,046 3,668 6% 20%
Kimberley 6,511 6,184 6,705 -5% 8%
Columbia Basin 32,094 30,826 n/a -4% -

Data Sources  

BC Stats
Columbia Basin Trust State of the Basin

 

Age and Gender Structure of Population (C-2)

What are we measuring?

The total number of residents, by age group, for males and females

Why are we measuring it?

Understanding the age and gender distribution of a population is integral to creating a diverse, welcoming community for a range of different age groups. Different age groups require different services and opportunities such as employment, healthcare, accessibility, childcare and education.

How are we doing?

Similar to most of Canada, Rossland’s population has proportionally more “baby-boomers” in the 45 to 59 years of age groups than any other age range. Many of these people will be leaving the workforce over the next ten to 20 years. Compared to the rest of the province, Rossland has proportionally fewer residents in the age groups from 20 to 34 years of age. With this current demographic distribution, the predicted effects of the aging “baby-boomers” may be more pronounced in Rossland than in British Columbia in general.

Age and gender distribution of Rossland's population

Rossland's and British Columbia's population distribution

 

Data Sources  

Statistics Canada

 

Average Household Size (C-3)

 

Average household sizes (people per household)
as reported in 2006 Census by Statistics Canada

What are we measuring?

Average number of individuals per household

Why are we measuring it?

Average household size can provide insight into lifestyle, energy consumption and housing needs.

How are we doing?

Rossland’s average household size is 2.4 people. This is just under the provincial average of 2.5 people per household.

Rossland has a slightly higher average household size than other communities within the region.

Data Sources

Statistics Canada

 

Average Annual Snowfall (C-4)

What are we measuring?

Average annual snowfall at Red Mountain
from 2004/2005 to 2009/2010

Annual estimates of average snowfall on Red Mountain

Why are we measuring it?

Snowfall is integral to Rossland’s tourism industry and, over time, it may provide insight into how Rossland’s climate is changing. There is limited meteorological data available for Rossland, as the closest operating weather station is located in Castlegar. Red Mountain Resort, the local ski hill operator, monitors snowfall levels from October to April and has been archiving this data online since the 2004/2005 ski season.  

How are we doing?

Red Mountain snowfall for the 2009/2010 season was 555 cm. Out of the previous six ski seasons, the 2007/2008 season had the highest snowfall with 690.7 cm total and the 2004/2005 had the lowest snowfall with 454 cm total.

Data Sources  

Red Mountain Resort
 

Land Management

Desired Future

The town is centred on a compact and vibrant downtown core, connected by trails and green corridors to development at the base of Red Mountain, Redstone Alpine Golf Resort and to new developments. A diverse range of residential and tourist accommodation exists that satisfy the needs of residents and visitors. Buildings and infrastructure are designed and restored in ways that use resources responsibly, and that compliment the natural environment, heritage and overall aesthetic of the town. The downtown core is thriving and the restored heritage character attracts visitors to Rossland.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: The built environment is designed to make efficient use of land resources and limit sprawling development.

End-state Goal 2: The community contains a wide diversity of housing types, shops, services and employment opportunities, and is as complete a community as possible for a city of its size.

End-state Goal 3: The built environment is integrated with the natural features.

End-state Goal 4: Commercial developments, including resort-related enterprises and new industry, are located and operated in ways that are compatible with the community’s social fabric, high quality of life, and environment.

End-state Goal 5: A vibrant downtown remains the commercial, cultural, and social focal point of the community.

End-state Goal 6: Development is undertaken in ways that enhance both the economy and the environment.

 

 

Dwelling Density (LM-1) 

What are we measuring?

Density of accommodation type (residential, tourist/visitor residential, second homes, etc.) on land that is serviced and zoned for residential development

Why are we measuring it?

To varying degrees, this indicator addresses the End-state Goals of making efficient use of land resources and limiting sprawl (End-state Goal #1), and maintaining a vibrant downtown as the commercial, cultural and social focal point of the community (End-state Goal # 6). Increased density is a common measure of sustainability in planning and can lower the expense of infrastructure and property taxes, enhance the viability of public transit, and, assuming high occupancy, is associated with community vibrancy. This indicator also captures infill and the addition of legal secondary suites.

How are we doing?

Currently, Rossland has only baseline data for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Dwelling density was calculated by dividing the number of units by the area of the indicated zones. A housing unit is a single residence, either a single family home or a suite in a multifamily dwelling.

In the Rossland core, the dwelling density is 8.57 housing units per hectare. In the past three years, Rossland has made several bylaw amendments that could potentially increase density by facilitating the creation of secondary suites, duplexes and the creation of infill housing on smaller lots. The number of building permits and housing starts are reported in both Community Economic Development and Housing and Affordability.

While we do not have adequate data to depict trends, based on the recent planning changes, Rossland is moving slowly towards its goal of efficient land use that limits sprawl.

Dwelling density by zone type (units/hectare)
  Rossland Core* Rural Residential Rossland Core** Redstone and Red Mountain Base Area***

Housing Units Per Hectare

8.57
0.17
1.09

*Combination R1, R1 SS, R1 GH, R1-S, R1B/B, R MH, C1, C2, C3, CD4, CD5, CD6, CD8, CD9, R2, R3, R3i, CD4 (single family, secondary suite, multifamily, commercial - mostly within Rossland core)
**RRa & RRb (rural residential -perimeter of Rossland core)
***Combination of R4, R5, RM6, CD1-LDR1, MFR1, AVC1, AVC2, AVC3, AVC4, CD2-GW1, GW2, LDGW, CD3-RFA1, RFA2, CD7, CD10 (single family residential, resort, multifamily, etc. - mostly Redstone, Red Mountain base area)

Data Sources

City of Rossland

 

Diversity of Total Housing Stock (LM-2)

What are we measuring?

The proportion of housing stock by type (single family, homes with registered secondary suites and multi-family dwellings)
Why are we measuring it?

A variety of accommodation types are required to meet the needs of a diverse community. End-state Goal #2 sets a target that Rossland contain a wide diversity of housing types, shops, services and employment opportunities, and is as complete a community as possible for a city of its size. This indicator directly reflects Rossland’s recognition of the importance of providing a diversity of housing options. Secondary suites that are not registered with the City of Rossland are not included in the indicator. This indicator is repeated in the Housing and Affordability Focus Area (HA-1) as it relates to the End-state Goals for that area.

How are we doing?

Rossland has only baseline data for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Currently, single family dwellings account for 77% of the housing units in Rossland. Of these single family dwellings, there are eight homes with registered secondary suites and 34 mobile homes. In BC, single family dwellings accounted for 49% of the total housing stock, and in Fernie, they accounted for 63%.

Multifamily dwellings account for 23% of the housing units in Rossland. Data are not currently available to distinguish between duplexes, row houses and apartments. The number of units in each multifamily building is utilized as a proxy for this in the table below. Several of the larger multifamily buildings are condos at the base of the ski hill that are rented out as tourist accommodation during the ski season. Dedicated seniors housing accounts for 43 units of the multifamily dwellings, comprising 2% of the total housing stock.

While we do not have adequate data to analyze trends, the recent changes to Rossland bylaws may facilitate the creation of more homes with secondary suites and smaller multifamily developments. Rossland is moving slowly towards its goal of providing a diversity of housing options.

 

Category

Number of Units

Percent

Single Family

1405

77%

Single Family with Registered Secondary Suites

7

<.5%

Mobile Homes

34

 

Multifamily

424

23%

Buidings with 2 units

11

 

Buildings with 3-5 units

13

 

Buildings with 7-20 units

13

 

Buildings with >20 units

6

 

Total Residences

1829

 

Diversity of housing units in Rossland in 2010

Data Sources

City of Rossland
 

Natural Environment and Resource Lands

Desired Future

Rossland’s spectacular setting in the alpine environment gives the community its unique character. Designated and protected green spaces, green corridors, riparian areas, and natural ecosystems allow indigenous flora and fauna to thrive. The built environment is also integrated into the natural environment though native tree plantings and ‘ribbons’ of green traversing the city and along stream corridors. In addition, community gardens have been established, providing potential sites for growing local produce.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: An extensive network of green spaces, natural habitat, environmentally sensitive areas, riparian zones, water catchment areas, and wildlife corridors is protected.

End-state Goal 2: Areas with exceptional productive capacity for agriculture or silviculture are protected from urban development and managed to maintain or enhance the health and biodiversity of surrounding natural systems.

End-state Goal 3: Over time, the built environment is integrated into the natural environment in a way that capitalizes on ecological functions and avoids or manages risks associated with natural hazards.
 

Area of Protected Land and Parks (NE-1)

What are we measuring?

Area of land protected from development or other potentially damaging activities

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator directly reflects End-state Goal #1, which sets a goal of protecting an extensive network of green spaces, natural habitat, environmentally sensitive areas, riparian zones, water catchment areas and wildlife corridors. Protected areas are intended ensure adequate ecosystem functioning and protect biodiversity. They also provide residents much valued opportunities to observe and interact with nature. City-owned parks must be viewed in a slightly different manner than other protected areas. These parks serve a variety of essential purposes, which do not necessarily include conservation. These purposes include the provision of recreation opportunities and green space.

How are we doing?

Rossland currently has only baseline information for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Protected areas and parks in Rossland (based on the Official Community Plan designation Parks, Trails and Open Space) total 167.22 ha, an additional 260.87 ha are zoned Parks and Open Space.  However there is an overlap between these two zones of 34.05 and some portions of the 13.94 ha of City owned parks fall into these two zones.  Accounting for the overlaps, Rossland has:
 
  • 120.55 ha as OCP Protected Areas and Parks (PTOS)
  • 213.25 ha as Parks and Open Space Zoning (P2)
  • 34.03 ha as the Overlap of these two Protected Areas (P2 and PTOS)
  • 13.94 ha as City Parks
 
In total Rossland has 381.77 ha of Protected Areas within the City Area and 6.8% of the City Area is protected. By contrast, the City of Fernie had 49 ha of protected areas within its jurisdiction, although protected area in the Greater Fernie Area is much higher.
 
In addition, Rossland has 24.62 ha in the Trail Creek Development Permit Area as highlighted on the map for this indicator.  This is a 60 m buffer around Trail Creek (30 m on either side of the creek) with special development restrictions.  The purpose is not to prevent development but to protect the sensitive areas along the creek when development occurs.  This area is not included in the 'protected areas' calculation.  Looking to the future, the City is in the process of finalizing the parkland dedication from Redstone. The total area for the expected additional parklands in Redstone is 5.64 ha.
 
Rossland is moving toward its goal of protecting an extensive network of green spaces, natural habitat, environmentally sensitive areas, riparian zones, water catchment areas, and wildlife corridors.
 
download map PDF

Data Sources

City of Rossland

 

Rural Stream Water Quality (NE-2)

What are we measuring?

Levels of E.Coli and turbidity

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator does not directly measure the achievement of one of the End-state Goals, but is nonetheless a critical indicator of the broad health of Rossland’s Natural Environment and Resource Lands. Three major Rossland streams (Topping Creek, Hannah Creek and Murphy Creek) are currently tested for E.Coli and turbidity, in addition to 41 other general water quality parameters, microbes and metals. Changes in these parameters may indicate that human activity in the watershed is impacting the environment. In 2008, all three streams were assessed to establish baseline data. Each stream will now be assessed once every three years on a rotating basis.

How are we doing?

Rossland currently has only baseline information for Murphy Creek and Hannah Creek. Between 2008 and 2009, levels of E.Coli in Topping Creek increased from 2 CFU/100ml to 7 CFU/100m. Chlorination and filtration removes the E.Coli and turbidity and provides treated water that meets Interior Health Authority requirements and Canadian Drinking Water Standards. The BC provincial standards for E.Coli in raw drinking water that receives chlorination and filtration are that E.Coli must not exceed 100 CFU/100ml in 90% of samples taken in a 30 day period.
 
With this limited data, it is not possible to say if Rossland is moving toward or away from its End-state Goals and Desired Future.

 

Topping Creek
(2008)

Murphy Creek
(2008)

Hannah Creek

(2008)

Topping Creek

(2009)

E.Coli
CFU/100ml

2

1

1

7

Turbidity
NTU

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

Data Sources

City of Rossland
 

Community Economic Development

Desired Future

Rossland’s traditional natural resource economy has become increasingly value-added and exists alongside a year-round tourism and knowledge-based sector. Through collaborative actions across the wider region, residents have the capacity to find or create work opportunities and incomes to support sustainable lifestyles. The community works together to support local businesses and to encourage innovation, new businesses, and an entrepreneurial spirit. A diverse, resilient, and vibrant economic base is supported by state-of-the art information and communication technology (ICT) systems. ICT enables a significant number of residents to work from home or to expand their business through virtual networks. Sustainable business practices ensure the continued liveability of the region and contribute to the long-term survival and profitability of the business sector.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: A diverse and balanced economic base provides quality employment and sustainable wages for residents.

End-state Goal 2: A year-round tourism economy exists alongside a broad range of value-added industries.

End-state Goal 3: World-class information and communications technology allows Rossland to attract, retain, and support an elite group of entrepreneurs and professionals who work remotely.   

End-state Goal 4: Growth and renewal is generated by local trades, supporting a stable and skilled workforce.

End-state Goal 5: Sustainable businesses, of appropriate size and type, locate in Rossland where they contribute to a strong local economy.  

End-state Goal 6: The community’s traditional entrepreneurial spirit, and innovative educational and training programs generate ongoing employment opportunities for youth and new residents.   

End-state Goal 7: Heritage, arts and culture are pillar industries that provide stable and diverse revenue sources.

End-state Goal 8: The City works with businesses to support access to local products.

 

Building Permits and Starts (ED-1)

What are we measuring?

The value and number of residential, non-residential and visitor accommodation building permits per year by type, and the number of housing starts

Why are we measuring it?

Building permits and starts are indicators of the level of economic activity.  This indicator reflects several of the End-state Goals for Community Economic Development, including goals of having a year-round tourism economy alongside a broad range of value-added industries (End-state Goal #2), and growth and renewal generated by local trades, supporting a stable and skilled workforce (End-state Goal #4). This indicator is repeated in Housing and Affordability (HA-2) as it also relates directly to the End-state Goals for that Focus Area.

How are we doing?

Rossland currently has only baseline information for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Of the 84 residential permits issued in 2009, there were a total of 8 Housing Starts (this refers to buildings not individual units and includes mobile homes) in the City. These housing starts accounted for approximately 45% of the value of the 86 total building permits that were issued in 2009. Only one permit noted the inclusion of a secondary suite. During this time, only two non-residential building permits were issued and there were no visitor accommodation building permits issued.
 
The total value of the building permits issued in 2009 was $6,163,822.00.
 
Without the necessary data to report trends, it is not possible to say if Rossland is moving toward its Vision for 2030.
Number and value of building permits and housing starts in Rossland in 2009

Type

Number

Value

Non-Residential Permits

2

$64,500

Residential Permits

84

$6,099,322

Single family/Duplex Residential Permits

83

$5,236,322

Multifamily Residential Permits

1

$863,00

Housing Starts

8

$2,803,337

Visitor Accommodation Permits

0

-

Total Permits

86

$6,163,822

Data Sources  

City of Rossland
 

Proportion of Labour Force Living and Working within Rossland (ED-2)

Location of workplace of Rossland residents by proportion of labour force as reported in 2006 Census

What are we measuring?

The percent of full time Rossland residents who are in the labour force and stay in Rossland to work

Why are we measuring it?

This measure is indicative of how successful Rossland is at providing opportunities for people to live and work, and is directly related to End-state Goal #1: A diverse and balanced economic base provides quality employment and sustainable wages for residents.
 
This indicator, while informative, should be interpreted with care.  For example, one should consider the type and quality of jobs available in Rossland. Likewise, this indicator can be misleading if, for example, there is a significant out-migration of workers who relocate closer to their place of work. This type of exodus would result in a higher proportion of Rossland residents living and working in Rossland, but this change would not be a direct result of increased local employment opportunities.

How are we doing?

Rossland currently has only baseline information for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. According to the 2006 Census, approximately 30% of employed Rossland’s residents work within the City and 49% work within the regional district (but outside of Rossland). This is far below the provincial average of 47% of employed residents who work within their municipality of residence and also far below a number of other small communities in the Kootenays.
Without the necessary data to report trends, it is not possible to say if Rossland is moving toward its Vision for 2030.

Location of workplace of Rossland residents by proportion of labour force as reported in 2006 Census

Percent employed workforce working in the census subdivision (municipality) that they live in as reported in 2006 Census

 

Workforce Proportion

Rossland

29%

Trail

75%

Fernie

70%

Invermere

69%

British Columbia

47%

Data Sources

Statistics Canada http://www.statcan.gc.ca/
 

New Business Licenses (ED-3)

What are we measuring?

Number of renewed and new business
licenses per year for the City of Rossland

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator is directly linked to the end-state goal that the community’s traditional entrepreneurial spirit, and innovative educational and training programs generate ongoing employment opportunities for youth and new residents (End-state Goal #6) and provides a measure of both entrepreneurial activity and economic activity.

How are we doing?

From 2005 to 2010, the total number of business licenses issued annually in Rossland, including new licenses and renewals, grew from 90 to 201.  The number of new business licenses taken out in one year peaked in 2006 at 44. This trend of stability with slow growth continued in 2010. In total, 201 business licenses were taken out in 2010 including 21 new business licenses.
 
Based on this data, Rossland is moving towards its Desired Future and End-state Goals for Community Economic Development in 2030, both of which emphasize entrepreneurial activity.  
 
Please note that the inconsistencies between the 2006 and 2007 numbers (that there were slightly more business licenses renewed in 2007 than were taken out in 2006) are likely due to reactivated licenses.

Data Sources  

City of Rossland

Recreation and Leisure

Desired Future

The town promotes and supports a healthy and active population and this is reinforced by a community that embraces a balance between work and play. Rossland is a unique destination for year-round outdoor alpine recreation. Residents and visitors of all ages and abilities engage in high quality, diverse recreational opportunities while respecting and protecting the surrounding natural environment. The conservation and sustainable use of green spaces and development and maintenance of an extensive network of multi-use trails connects both people and the community with nature. Accessible, well-maintained playing fields and indoor recreation facilities complement the range of outdoor experiences. The community hosts a number of arts and culture events.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: A healthy and active population is engaged in year-round recreation and leisure.

End-state Goal 2: A world-class network of designated, connected, accessible, and well-maintained trails exists throughout the community.

End-state Goal 3: Publicly accessible green spaces are well-distributed within the community, and allow residents and visitors of all ages to interact with nature and to experience the splendour of the mountain environment in different seasons.

End-state Goal 4: Red Mountain Resort, Redstone Alpine Golf Resort and other developments, provide opportunities for people to live, work, and play.

End-state Goal 5: Indoor and outdoor recreation and leisure facilities are located within the community, are well-maintained, family-friendly, and meet the needs of residents and visitors alike.

 

Length and Location of Trails (RL-1)

What are we measuring?

Inventory of maintained trails by surface type and activity

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator is directly linked to End-state Goal #2: A world-class network of designated, connected, accessible and well-maintained trails exists throughout the community. Rossland’s trail network has been identified as playing a fundamental role in Rossland residents’ quality of life and community economic development. This indicator is repeated in Transportation (T-3) as it relates directly to the End-state Goals for that Focus Area.

How are we doing?

Rossland currently has only baseline data for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. There are a total of 33.88 km of trails within the City limits. These trails are maintained by both the City of Rossland and the Kootenay Columbia Trails Society (KCTS). The majority of these trails are KCTS trails.  However in 2009 and 2010 the City constructed three new trails - Centre Star Gulch, Little Nugget (also known as the Museum Trail) and Louie Joe (also known as Trail Creek Trail) bringing the total of City owned trails to 2.1 km. All of these trails are designated for multi-purpose, non motorized use and are unpaved.  The total length of KCTS trails outside the City boundary is 74.59 km.  Thus the total length of trails in the Rossland area (KCTS and City owned) is 108.47 km.

Without the necessary data to report trends, it is not possible to say if Rossland is moving toward its Vision for 2030. However the City has recently completed an Active Transport Plan that identifies opportunities to improve Rossland’s active transport infrastructure including paths and trails. The plan lists 45 trails within the city limits that could be developed.  This indicator will help to track the implementation of this plan. The City has also been working with KCTS to inventory local trails.

 

Length of trails in and around Rossland

Type of Trail

Length

KCTS trails completely within City bound    ary

13.55 km

Portions of KCTS trails within City boundary        

18.23 km

City owned trails within the City boundary

2.1 km

Total trails within City boundary

33.88 km    

KCTS trails in Rossland area outside City boundary

74.59 km

Total KCTS trails in Rossland area (inside and outside of City boundary)

106.37 km

TOTAL trails in Rossland area (inside and outside City boundary)

108.47 km

 

Data Sources

City of Rossland

Recreation Programs (RL-2)

What are we measuring?

Number of Rossland Recreation programs offered, number of participants and the percent of programs with zero enrollment.

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator reflects End-state Goal #1 which sets a goal of having a healthy and active population engaged in year-round recreation and leisure.

How are we doing?

Rossland currently has only baseline data available for this indicator for December 2009 to March 2010 (Winter Programs 2009/2010).  In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Without the necessary data to report trends, it is not possible to say if Rossland is moving toward its Vision for 2030. In total, 45 programs for a variety of age groups were offered in the Rossland Recreation Winter 2009/2010 with a total enrollment of 351 people. Of the programs offered, 27% had zero enrollment and had to be cancelled.

Although Seniors appear to be underrepresented, it should be noted that they do participate in classes targeted at Adults in general.  Seniors may also more likely to participate in drop in classes rather than regularly scheduled classes.  Programming offered for Children and Preschoolers is well-subscribed. Rossland Recreation is currently implementing an enhanced communication plan and actively pursuing new programs to bring to the community. They are also developing community partnerships with private enterprises to establish regional recreation. 

 

Age Group

Number of Programs Offered

Number of Spaces Occupied*

Percent Programs with Zero Enrollment

Family

5

26

40%

Preschool (0-5)

1

55

0%

Children (5-12)

11

84

18%

Youth (12-17)

3

9

33%

Adult (18+)

25

177

24%

TOTAL

45

351

27%

Number of Rossland Recreation programs and participation rates by age group for December 2009 - March 2010 (Winter Programs 2009/2010)

*Potential errors associated with weekly estimates for drop in classes.

 

Physical Activity Participation Levels (RL-3)

Most Popular Physical Activities in Rossland in 2011

What are we measuring?

The proportion of residents reporting participation in physical recreational activities more than three times a week for 30 minutes or more throughout the year and the types of physical recreation activities they are participating in.

Why are we measuring it?

Physical activity has a wide range of health benefits, and this indicator reflects End-state Goal #1, which sets a goal of having a healthy and active population engaged in year-round recreation and leisure.

How are we doing?

Walking for exercise, skiing and snowboarding, gardening and yardwork, cross country skiing and biking topped the list of physical activities that Rossland residents engage in.  The types of activities engaged in did vary a little bit by gender, with women being more inclined to walk, garden, cross-country ski, swim, run, do home exercises and exercise classes, while men are more inclined to ski and snowboard, bike and golf.

Many activities are stable across age categories, but skiing and snowboarding, biking, swimming and running tend to decrease with age, while walking and golfing increase.

Rossland residents on the whole are very active with 92% of Rosslanders in all age categories engaging in 30 minutes or more of physical activity at least 3 days a week, while 60% engage in 30 minutes or more of physical activity at least 5 days a week and 29% engage in 60 minutes or more of physical activity physical activity at least 5 days a week.

 

Duration of Exercise

1 to 2 days/week

   3 to 4 days/week

   5 to 7 days/week

3 or more days/week

30 minutes or more

6%

32%

60%

92%

60 minutes or more

18%

24%

29%

53%

Percent of individuals engaging in 30 to 60 minutes or more of physical activity by days of the week in 2011

Frequency and Duration of Exercise by Age Group in 2011

Exercise duration and frequency is remarkably stable across age groups and genders in Rossland. Men and women in all age categories seem to exercise the same amount each week.  Men are slightly more likely to exercise for more than 60 minutes 5 to 7 days a week, whereas men and women are equally likely to exercise for more than 30 minutes at least three or more days a week.  Differences in the duration and frequency of exercise are most noticeable in the 45 to 54 age group in which more men exercise for a longer duration than women.

Exercise frequency and duration appears to decrease slightly as both men and women reach the 35 to 44 age category, when it appears that many individuals reduce the number of days per week that they exercise, but not the duration, and then increases again once they reach the 55 to 64 age category although it never quite reaches the same frequency and duration as in those under age 34.

Data Sources  

State of Rossland Survey

 

Housing and Affordability

Desired Future

Rossland has a sufficient supply of safe, healthy, diverse and affordable housing and accommodation to meet the needs of permanent residents of all income levels. Housing affordability is enhanced through efficient use of energy and resources and by designing buildings that can be adapted over time to accommodate different uses, changes in technology, and demographics. Employment opportunities close to home provide job satisfaction and adequate incomes for sustainable livelihoods. Residents have access to affordable food products, learning opportunities, and arts, culture, and recreation programs.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: All permanent residents and seasonal employees have access to healthy, livable, and affordable housing and accommodation.

End-state Goal 2: A variety of accommodation types, tenures, and sizes ensures that residents and visitors of all ages and incomes have a diversity of market and non-market housing choice.

End-state Goal 3: Housing is designed and located to minimize long-term operating costs and infrastructure investments.

End-state Goal 4: Property taxes for residents and businesses are competitive with those of other municipalities of similar size.

 

Diversity of Total Housing Stock (HA-1)  (repeat of LM-2)

What are we measuring?

The proportion of housing stock by type (single family, homes with registered secondary suites and multi-family dwellings)

Why are we measuring it?

A variety of accommodation types are required to meet the options of a diverse community. End-state Goal #2 states that a variety of accommodation types, tenures, and sizes ensures that residents and visitors of all ages and incomes have a diversity of market and non-market housing choice.  This indicator directly reflects End-state Goal #2 and Rossland’s recognition of the importance of providing a diversity of housing options. Secondary suites that are not registered with the City of Rossland are not included in the indicator. This indicator is a repeat of an indicator in Land Management (LM-2) as it also relates directly to the End-state Goals for that Focus Area.

How are we doing?

Rossland has only baseline data for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Currently, single family dwellings account for 77% of the housing units in Rossland. Of these single family dwellings, there are eight homes with registered secondary suites and 34 mobile homes. In BC, single family dwellings accounted for 49% of the total housing stock, and in Fernie, they accounted for 63%.

Multifamily dwellings account for 23% of the housing units in Rossland. Data are not currently available to distinguish between duplexes, row houses and apartments. The number of units in each multifamily building is utilized as a proxy for this in the table below. Several of the larger multifamily buildings are condos at the base of the ski hill that are rented out as tourist accommodation during the ski season. Dedicated seniors housing accounts for 43 units of the multifamily dwellings, comprising 2% of the total housing stock.

While we do not have adequate data to analyze trends, the recent changes to Rossland bylaws may facilitate the creation of more homes with secondary suites and smaller multifamily developments. Rossland is moving slowly towards its goal of providing a diversity of housing options.

Diversity of housing units in Rossland in 2010

Category

Number of Units

Percent

Single Family

1405

77%

Single Family with Registered Secondary Suites

7

<.5%

Mobile Homes

34

 

Multifamily

424

23%

Buidings with 2 units

11

 

Buildings with 3-5 units

13

 

Buildings with 7-20 units

13

 

Buildings with >20 units

6

 

Total Residences

1829

 

Data Sources

City of Rossland

 

Building Permits and Starts (HA-2) (Repeat of ED-1)

What are we measuring?

The value and number of residential, non-residential and visitor accommodation building permits per year by type, and the number of housing starts

Why are we measuring it?

End-state Goal #2 states that a variety of accommodation types, tenures, and sizes ensures that residents and visitors of all ages and incomes have a diversity of market and non-market housing choice. Building permits and starts are indicators of the type and diversity of new housing in Rossland and therefore are an indicator Rossland’s movement towards achieving End-state Goal #2. This indicator is a repeat of an indicator in Economic Development (ED-1) as it also relates to the End-state Goals for that Focus Area.

How are we doing?

Rossland currently has only baseline information for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Of the 84 residential permits issued In 2009, there were a total of 8 housing starts (this refers to buildings not individual units and includes mobile homes) in the City. These housing starts accounted for approximately 45% of the value of the 86 building permits that were issued in 2009 with a dollar value of above $0. Only one permit noted the inclusion of a secondary suite. During this time, only two non-residential building permits were issued and there were no visitor accommodation building permits issued. See the building permit map in the Community Economic Development Focus Area of this Report.

The total value of the building permits issued in 2009 was $6,163,822.00.

Without the necessary data to report trends, it is not possible to say if Rossland is moving toward its Vision for 2030.
Number and value of building permits and housing starts in Rossland in 2009

Type

Number

Value

Non-Residential Permits

2

$64,500

Residential Permits

84

$6,099,322

Single family/Duplex Residential Permits

82

$5,236,322

Multifamily Residential Permits

1

$863,00

Housing Starts

8

$2,803,337

Visitor Accommodation Permits

0

-

Total Permits

86

$6,163,822

Data Sources  

City of Rossland

Property Taxes (HA-3)

Municipal residential taxes on a representative home
in Rossland, Warfield Fernie, Invermere and Trail in 2009

What are we measuring?

Value and rate of Rossland property taxes relative to the region and other municipalities

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator measures our progress toward End-state Goal #4: Property taxes for residents and businesses are competitive with those of other municipalities of similar size. Property taxes have been identified as an affordability challenge associated with living in Rossland and recruiting new residents. However, each municipality has a unique tax base and expenditures, making across-the-board comparisons potentially misleading as many factors come into play in determining overall taxation level.

How are we doing?

In 2009, the total residential property tax burden (total residential taxes, parcel tax and fees) on a representative Rossland dwelling (total assessed value divided by number of residential units) was $3,594 and the tax rate (not including parcel tax and fees) was $11.16/$1000. While Rossland’s taxation rate has decreased by approximately $4.54/$1000 since 2003, the average amount of municipal residential taxes paid has increased from $3299 to $3594, mostly due to increasing property values. The rate of increase is lower than the Bank of Canada rate of inflation over that same period (1.82% annually).  

In 2009, Invermere residents, despite having a lower taxation rate than Rossland residents, had a higher tax burden. This was due at least in part to Invermere’s higher property values. It should also be noted that Rossland only has a residential tax base, unlike Trail, and this affects how much residents have to pay for services and amenities.  Other small communities that have similarly residential tax bases often offer fewer amenities than Rossland does.

Based on this data, it is unclear if Rossland is moving toward or away from its Vision for 2030. While the rate of taxation is dropping and the dollars paid are being outpaced by general inflation, the reality is that homeowners in Rossland have experienced increasing property tax burdens.

Municipal residential tax rates on a representative home in Rossland, Warfield, Fernie, Invermere, and Trail

 

Rossland, Invermere, Fernie, and Trail total residential taxes paid and associated rates from 2003 to 2009

 

Year

Rossland (Total*)

Rossland (Rate**)

Invermere (Total*)

Invermere (Rate**)

Fernie (Total*)

Fernie (Rate**)

Trail
(Total*)

Trail (Rate**)

2003

$3,299.35

$15.07

$2,535.52

$9.99

$2,458.41

$12.16

$1,963.84

$15.25

2004

$3,292.66

$14.62

$2,208.51

$9.16

$2,625.75

$12.43

$1,915.64

$15.09

2005

$3,285.26

$12.89

$2,865.73

$8.38

$2,587.57

$10.92

$1,929.07

$14.00

2006

$3,509.78

$12.61

$3,130.74

$7.10

$3,000.52

$9.51

$2,024.64

$13.22

2007

$3,229.32

$13.83

$3,265.17

$6.36

$2,845.18

$8.72

$2,192.23

$11.57

2008

$3,566.05

$11.25

$3,600.59

$5.73

$3,074.18

$7.50

$2,578.76

$9.75

2009

$3,593.80

$11.16

$3,714.35

$5.66

$3,181.86

$7.60

$2,516.19

$8.96

*Total taxes and charges on a representative house
**Total tax rate (sum of municipal, regional district, school district, hospital district, etc.) per $1000

Data Sources

Ministry of Community and Rural Development
 

Housing Affordability and Core Housing Needs (HA-4)

Percent of households spending over 30%
of gross income on core housing needs
according to 2006 Census

What are we measuring?

The proportion of households that spent more than 30% of their gross household income on housing by tenure type

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator measures Rossland’s progress toward End-state Goal #1. End-state Goal #1 sets a goal that all permanent residents and seasonal employees have access to healthy, livable and affordable housing and accommodation. An inability to access housing for less than 30% of a household’s gross annual income is considered an issue concerning a community’s availability of affordable housing and ability to meet core housing needs.

This indicator does not capture the housing challenges of non-permanent residents who were not included in the Census. It also does not incorporate homelessness and affordability factors such as property taxes, nor does it reflect rapid changes in property values, as it is based on the 2006 Census. Outward migration in response to high housing costs can also impact this indicator, creating a false impression of affordability as lower income residents leave the region. It can also be skewed by a shift from rental properties to owner-occupied homes.

How are we doing?

According to the 2006 Census, approximately 18% of Rossland households were spending more than 30% of their gross annual income on housing, while approximately 41% of Rossland’s renting households were spending over 30% of their gross annual income on housing. The number of renting households spending in excess of 30% of their income on housing peaked at 61% in 2001. The total proportion of households whose core housing expenditures exceeded 30% of their income has decreased 2% since 2001 and is roughly 11% less than the British Columbia average.

While it appears that housing may be becoming more affordable in Rossland, a more detailed housing needs assessment is required to interpret whether these changes are due to a change in housing costs and income levels or alternatively, the out migration of lower paid workers.

Percent of Rossland households spending over 30% of their household income on housing according to the 1996, 2001 and 2006 Censuses

Year

All Tenure Types

Owned

Rented

1996

20%

16%

35%

2001

23%

15%

61%

2006

18%

15%

41%

 

Percent of households spending over 30% of gross income on core housing needs according to 2006 Census

 

Households Spending 30%
or more of Household Income on Housing

Renting Households Spending 30% or more of Household Income on Housing

Owning Households Spending 30% or more of Household Income on Housing

Rossland

18%

41%

15%

Trail

27%

44%

15%

Columbia Basin

21%

42%

16%

BC

29%

44%

23%

Data Sources  

Statistics Canada

 

Renting Households (HA-5)

Percent of households renting their housing
according to 2006 Census

What are we measuring?

The proportion of households that rented their homes in 2006

Why are we measuring it?

Low-income households may not be able to afford to own their own home and find that renting is a more affordable form of shelter. Rental housing is often the only option available to new families and young people. In other instances, households choose not to own their own home for personal reasons. Regardless of the reason, maintaining a spectrum of housing options is conducive to a diverse community. For this reason, the proportion of renting households is used as an indicator to monitor the degree of choice for current and prospective residents and is a reflection of End-state Goal #2: A variety of accommodation types, tenures, and sizes ensures that residents and visitors of all ages and incomes have a diversity of market and non-market housing choice.

How are we doing?

Percent of Rossland and British Columbia households
renting their housing according to the
1996, 2001 and 2006 Censuses

Currently, rental households in Rossland comprise approximately 14% of total households. This is less than half of the provincial proportion of 30% renting households. The relatively low proportion of rental households in Rossland is at least in part a product of the market preference for single-family dwellings and the historical local affordability of single-family dwellings compared to many urban areas.

Since 1996, there has been a gradual decline in rental households relative to total households in Rossland (see chart). This trend, combined with the high proportion of renting households spending in excess of 30% of gross household income on core housing needs (HA-4), suggests that Rossland is moving away from its goal of providing all permanent residents and seasonal employees access to affordable housing and a variety of accommodation tenures, and indicates the need for a housing needs assessment.  This indicator should be closely monitored in the future so that further trends can be observed.

Data Sources  

Statistics Canada
Columbia Basin Trust State of the Basin

 

Transportation

Desired Future

Rossland’s transportation system offers affordable, reliable, safe, accessible, frequent, green, and efficient means of moving within Rossland and to and from Rossland. The community’s livability is enhanced by an extensive local and regional trail network that supports non-motorized vehicles. Land use planning connects housing with services through trails and transit, thereby reducing automobile dependency. Rossland’s downtown core is accessible, pedestrian-friendly and linked to the resorts by a high quality public, equitably funded transit connection. The community encourages and supports low-impact environmentally-friendly transportation choices, thereby conserving the natural environment and increasing Rossland’s tourism appeal.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: A networked system of trails for walking, hiking, biking and skiing connects Rossland and serves to decrease traffic and congestion, and to improve year-round tourism appeal.

End-state Goal 2: The historic downtown is accessible and pedestrian friendly.

End-state Goal 3: There is a ‘sense of arrival’ at key entrances / gateways to Rossland and the downtown core.

End-state Goal 4: Public transit within and around Rossland is affordable, accessible, reliable, frequent, safe, comfortable and ‘green’. A high-quality connection links downtown with the resorts. Private vehicle dependence is minimized.

End-state Goal 5: Transportation systems utilize renewable energy sources and have minimal impact on air quality.    

End-state Goal 6: Traffic patterns that are the least hazardous to pedestrians and others are established and enforced

 

Journey-To-Work Mode (T-1)

Journey-to-work mode represented as proportions of the
employed labour force in Rossland according to 2006 Census

What are we measuring?

Proportion of residents who commute to work by car, bike, bus, on foot, etc.

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator reflects Rossland residents’ preferred transportation modes and provides insight into the level of dependency on privately owned vehicles. This indicator partially reflects movement towards End-state Goal #4, which sets a goal of minimizing dependence on private vehicles.

How are we doing?

At present, Rossland has only baseline data for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. In 2006, over 83% of Rossland residents drove a motor vehicle to work. This is well above the provincial average of 72% and is probably because only a small number of Rossland commuters (1%) use public transit. In contrast, 10% of Provincial commuters use public transit.  Rossland’s limited number of public transit users is likely strongly influenced by the limited public transit services available in Rossland, despite the efforts of City Council to work with BC Transit to improve Rossland’s transportation options.

Without the necessary data to report trends, it is not possible to say if Rossland is moving toward its Vision for 2030. However, based on the relatively low numbers of people commuting via means other than the single occupancy vehicle, it appears that Rossland is a long way from achieving its goal of minimizing impacts on air quality and having a functional transit system that meets residents’ needs.

Journey-to-work mode in 2006 represented as proportions of the employed labour force in Rossland and BC

Mode of Transportation

Rossland

BC

Car, truck, van, as driver

83%

72%

Car, truck, van, as passenger

5%

8%

Public transit

1%

10%

Walked or bicycled

10%

9%

All other modes

<1%

1%

Data Sources  

Statistics Canada
 

Transit Ridership (T-2)

What are we measuring?

Total and per capita annual ridership

Why are we measuring it?

Improving transit service with the intention of reducing single occupancy vehicles is consistent with End-state Goal #4 which states that: “Public transit within and around Rossland is affordable, accessible, reliable, frequent, safe, comfortable and ‘green.’  A high-quality connection links downtown with the resorts.  Private vehicle dependence is minimized.”  Transit ridership provides a behavior-based indicator of Rossland’s transit use.  While it does not indicate the achievement of End-state Goal #4 directly, in the sense that it does not provide data on the quality of public transit in Rossland, it does provide some indication of how well subscribed current transit services are.

How are we doing?

Although BC Transit does monitor ridership, at the time of this report, they were unable to provide data.  In future iterations, we aim to incorporate this indicator. However, it is worth noting that according to the 2006 Census, only 1% of Rossland residents commuted to work by bus. Provincially, 10% of residents commute to work by bus (see figures in Journey-to-Work Mode T-1).  

Data Sources

BC Transit

This indicator will be reported on as soon as information comes available from BC Transit.
 

Length and Location of Trails (T-3) (Repeat of RL-1)

Inventory of maintained trails by
surface type and activity

Why are we measuring it?

Rossland’s trail network has been identified as playing an integral role in Rossland residents’ quality of life and local economic development. End-state Goal #1 states that:  “A networked system of trails for walking, hiking, biking and skiing connects Rossland and serves to decrease traffic and congestion, and to improve year-round tourism appeal.”  This indicator measures Rossland’s progress toward End-state Goal #1. This indicator is a repeat of an indicator in Recreation and Leisure (RL-1) as it also relates directly to the End-state Goals for that Focus Area.

How are we doing?

Rossland currently has only baseline data for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. There are a total of 33.88 km of trails within the City limits. These trails are maintained by both the City of Rossland and the Kootenay Columbia Trails Society (KCTS). The majority of these trails are KCTS trails.  However in 2009 and 2010 the City constructed three new trails - Centre Star Gulch, Little Nugget (also known as Museum Trail) and Louie Joe (also known as Trail Creek Trail) bringing the total of City owned trails to 2.1 km. All of these trails are designated for multi-purpose, non motorized use and are unpaved.  The total length of KCTS trails outside the City boundary is 74.59 km.  Thus the total length of trails in the Rossland area (KCTS and City owned) is 108.47 km.

Without the necessary data to report trends, it is not possible to say if Rossland is moving toward its Vision for 2030. However the City has recently completed an Active Transport Plan that identifies opportunities to improve Rossland’s active transport infrastructure including paths and trails. The plan lists 45 trails within the city limits that could be developed.  This indicator will help to track the implementation of this plan. The City has also been working with KCTS to inventory local trails.

 

Length of trails in and around Rossland

Type of Trail

Length

KCTS trails completely within City bound    ary

13.55 km

Portions of KCTS trails within City boundary        

18.23 km

City owned trails within the City boundary

2.1 km

Total trails within City boundary

33.88 km    

KCTS trails in Rossland area outside City boundary

74.59 km

Total KCTS trails in Rossland area (inside and outside of City boundary)

106.37 km

TOTAL trails in Rossland area (inside and outside City boundary)

108.47 km

download map PDF

Data Sources  

The City of Rossland
 

Satisfaction with Downtown Pedestrian and Transit Accessibility by Season and Age Group (T-4)

 Satisfaction with downtown pedestrian accessibility by age group in winter 2011

 

What are we measuring?

Community members’ level of satisfaction with the accessibility of the downtown core

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator reflects in part the achievement of End-state Goal #6, which sets the goal of establishing and enforcing traffic patterns that are the least hazardous to pedestrians and others and End-state Goal #4 which focuses on ensuring public transit is affordable, accessible, reliable, frequent, comfortable and green and private vehicle dependence is minimized.

How are we doing?

Satisfaction with downtown pedestrian accessibility is fairly high, ranging from 65% of respondents indicating that they are very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with pedestrian accessibility in the winter to 78% of respondents indicating that they are very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with pedestrian accessibility in the summer.  Respondents indicating that they are very satisfied with pedestrian accessibility ranged from 35% in the winter to 50% in the summer, suggesting that improvements can be made to pedestrian accessibility.

Common themes in the comments suggest that satisfaction in the winter drops slightly due to snow and ice concerns and in the spring due to inaccessibility of trails and the amount of dog excrement on streets.  Dissatisfaction with pedestrian accessibility in the summer and fall seems largely related to the lack of sidewalks on main streets such as St. Paul Street and Le Roi Avenue.

Satisfaction with pedestrian accessibility was fairly stable across age groups but was lowest for those 65 and up and those 35 to 44 in all four seasons, dropping to 61% and 60% in these two age groups in the winter.

Satisfaction with downtown transit accessibility was fairly moderate with most respondents indicating that they are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied in all seasons –  ranging from 38% of respondents in winter to 43% in the summer.  Less than 50% of respondents expressed satisfaction with downtown transit accessibility in any season.  A common theme among respondents was that they do not use transit. 

Overall satisfaction with downtown transit accessibility in all seasons was highest for those age 65 and up and lowest for those aged 35 to 44, ranging from 51% for those 65 and up to 28% for those 35 to 44 in the winter.  However, those 65 and up were more likely to report that they were somewhat satisfied with the downtown transit accessibility rather than very satisfied.

This is baseline data.  In future iterations of the State of Rossland report in which a survey is undertaken we should be able to report on trends for this indicator.

Data Sources  

State of Rossland Survey

Intergenerational Care and Learning

Desired Future

Rossland’s affordable and multi-faceted education system provides a diversity of programs and opportunities and an essential foundation for cultural and social activities. Local education facilities continue to provide access to affordable, high quality K-12 education and the development of basic life skills. Residents and local organizations work together to provide support and care for children, seniors and other populations with special needs. Community activities and programs encourage intergenerational interaction and enhance well being, while Rossland’s built environment and institutional structures encourage lifelong learning for every member of society.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: Organizations and residents work together to meet the health and social needs of community members, especially children, the elderly and people with special needs.

End-state Goal 2: Residents of all ages have access to learning opportunities outside of the public education system, such as early learning opportunities, basic life-skills development, literacy training, and lifelong learning opportunities.

End-state Goal 3: A high-quality kindergarten through post-secondary system exists within Rossland and offers a diversity of programs that meet the community’s needs and expectations.

End-state Goal 4: Schools, public spaces and community facilities are accessible, welcoming, and well-utilized by residents and visitors of all ages and abilities

 

Student Enrollment (IC-1)

Rossland annual school enrollment from 2002/2003 to 2009/2010

What are we measuring?

The number of students enrolled in elementary and secondary schools in Rossland

Why are we measuring it?

Declining enrollment is an ongoing challenge for Rossland schools, due to current provincial public school funding formulas, which are enrollment based. Maintaining adequate enrollment is one of the components of Rossland’s progress toward End-state Goal #3.  End-state Goal #3 sets the goal that a high-quality kindergarten through post-secondary system exists within Rossland and offers a diversity of programs that meet the community’s needs and expectations.

How are we doing?

Overall enrollment in Rossland schools has been steadily declining since 2003. Since 2005, Rossland enrollment has declined by 9%, district wide (School District 20) enrollment has declined by 13% and provincial enrollment has declined by 3%.

Rossland annual school enrollment from 2002/2003 to 2009/2010

School Year

Elementary

Secondary

Total Enrollment

2002/2003

252

433

685

2003/2004

249

427

676

2004/2005

218

418

636

2005/2006

203

423

626

2006/2007

191

412

603

2007/2008

196

382

578

2008/2009

192

386

578

2009/2010

206

361

567

Data Sources

School District 20
British Columbia Ministry of Education
 

Volunteerism (IC-2)

Number of Volunteer Organizations or Associations
in which Individual is an Active Participant in 2011

What are we measuring?

Community members’ self-reported number of volunteer organizations or associations they participate in as an active member, including school groups, church social groups, community centres, ethnic associations or social, civic or fraternal clubs and number of times per year they volunteer.

Why are we measuring it?

Volunteerism is considered reflective of a healthy community.  This indicator will help measure the achievement of End-state Goal #1:  Organizations and residents work together to meet the health and social needs of community members, especially children, the elderly and people with special needs.  This indicator is repeated in Sense of Community (SC-2) as it also relates to the End-state Goals in that Focus Area.

How are we doing?

Most people in Rossland volunteer. The survey re- sults show that 84% of Rosslanders participate in at least one volunteer organization or association, 62% participate in at least 2 or more and 35% participate in at least 3 or more. This compares well to Fernie where 70% of people volunteer.

Except in the 45 to 54 age category, women uniformly volunteer more than men, with 90% of women offering their time to at least one organization while only 80% of men do so.  Volunteering is fairly consistent across age groups with peaks in the percentage of people who volunteer in the 45 to 54 age category and the 65 and up age category, particularly those that volunteer for more than one organization.  The non-volunteers (16% of Rosslanders) are spread fairly evenly across age categories, except in the 45 to 54 age group, in which only 5% of individuals do not volunteer.

In examining the number of times a year that individuals volunteer, the largest number of respondents, 30%, volunteer once a month while 22% volunteer once a week and 19% four times a year.  Women volunteer on a more frequent basis than men.  The number of times people volunteer a year is fairly stable across the age categories.  Individuals in the 15 and 24 and the 25 to 34 age groups are more likely to volunteer at least once a week, while those 45 and over are more likely to volunteer once a month.

This is baseline data.  In future iterations of the State of Rossland report in which a survey is undertaken we should be able to report on trends for this indicator.

Data Sources  

State of Rossland Survey

Sense of Community

Desired Future

Rossland is a safe, inclusive and welcoming community with a high level of social cohesion amongst a diversity of ages, cultures and lifestyles. The level of volunteerism is high and most year-round residents are engaged in governance and community development initiatives. Arts and cultural expression thrive in Rossland and are supported by both residents and visitors. Rossland’s natural environment and its heritage create a sense of place and an authentic small town charm that is unique to the region. It is this uniqueness that fosters pride and community spirit that serves to retain residents and to attract new residents and visitors.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: A diversity of people (ages, ethnicities, cultures, and lifestyles), visitors and non-permanent residents are welcomed and integrated into the community.

End-state Goal 2: Residents of all ages are engaged in the town’s arts and cultural activities and offerings, and actively participate in community groups and celebrations of community spirit.

End-state Goal 3: The authenticity and small town character and feel are maintained.

End-state Goal 4: Public amenities, including open spaces, schools, and facilities, are designed and operated in ways that provide residents of all ages with safe and convenient spaces for social, artistic and cultural expression and activity.

End-state Goal 5: A cross-section of historic buildings, monuments, and natural features are preserved in ways that maintain and promote Rossland’s heritage and unique ‘sense of place’.

 

Crime Rates (SC-1)

Number of crimes committed per 1000 persons
in Rossland in 2008 and 2009

What are we measuring?

The number of reported violent and property crimes for every 1,000 people

Why are we measuring it?

Crime rates provide an indication of how safe Rossland is a community and directly reflect the priority of safety as stated in the Desired Future for Sense of Community. This indicator only includes crimes reported by, or to, the police.

How are we doing?

Between 2008 and 2009, all forms of reported crime in Rossland declined, with Total Crimes decreasing by approximately 5 reported incidents per 1,000 residents.

Data Sources  

City of Rossland and Trail RCMP

 

Volunteerism (SC-2) (Repeat of IC-2)

Number of Volunteer Organizations or Associations
in which Individual is an Active Participant in 2011

What are we measuring?

Community members’ self-reported number of volunteer organizations or associations they participate in as an active member, including school groups, church social groups, community centres, ethnic associations or social, civic or fraternal clubs and number of times per year they volunteer.

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator in part reflects movement towards End-state Goal #2 in which community members actively participate in community groups and cultural activities.  This indicator a repeat of an indicator in Intergenerational Care and Learning (IC-2) as it also relates to the End-state Goals in that Focus Area.

How are we doing?

Most people in Rossland volunteer. The survey results show that 84% of Rosslanders participate in at least one volunteer organization or association, 62% participate in at least 2 or more and 35% participate in at least 3 or more. This compares well to other communities, such as Fernie, where 70% of people volunteer.

Except in the 45 to 54 age category, women uniformly volunteer more than men, with 90% of women offering their time to at least one organization while only 80% of men do so.  Volunteering is fairly consistent across age groups with peaks in the percentage of people who volunteer in the 45 to 54 age category and the 65 and up age category, particularly those that volunteer for more than one organization.  The non-volunteers (16% of Rosslanders) are spread fairly evenly across age categories, except in the 45 to 54 age group, in which only 5% of individuals do not volunteer.

In examining the number of times a year that individuals volunteer, the largest number of respondents, 30%, volunteer once a month while 22% volunteer once a week and 19% four times a year.  Women volunteer on a more frequent basis than men.  The number of times people volunteer a year is fairly stable across the age categories.  Individuals in the 15 and 24 and the 25 to 34 age groups are more likely to volunteer at least once a week, while those 45 and over are more likely to volunteer once a month.

This is baseline data.  In future iterations of the State of Rossland report in which a survey is undertaken we should be able to report on trends for this indicator.

Data Sources  

State of Rossland Survey

 

Cultural Opportunities Participation (SC-3)

What are we measuring?

The number of live acts and arts events, and the level of attendance as reported by the Rossland Council for Arts and Culture (RCAC) and the City of Rossland

Why are we measuring it?

Arts and cultural opportunities and participation rates have been identified as a key factor in Rossland’s ongoing sustainability.  End-state Goal #2 establishes the goal that residents of all ages are engaged in the town’s arts and cultural activities and offerings, and actively participate in community groups and celebrations of community spirit.

How are we doing?

Currently, Rossland has only estimated baseline data for this indicator. RCAC will work with Visions to Action to track this indicator in future. RCAC hosts approximately 10 monthly coffee houses per year with approximately 80 attendees at each event. These coffee houses host a range of local performers. The Council also hosts 3 to 5 performances per year. From September 2008 to June 2009, attendance averaged approximately 130 people at each performance. From September 2009 to June 2010, attendance declined to approximately 85 average attendees at each performance.
 
In 2010, the Miners Hall - a major venue for cultural events - was rented for cultural events for the following number of hours:
  • Gold Fever Follies (practices and performances) - 581 Hours
  • Arts Council and Rotary - 66 Hours
  • Private Rentals for Theatre, Bands and other performances - 451 Hours
  • TOTAL - 1,098 Hours

Data Sources  

Rossland Council for Arts and Culture

City of Rossland

 

Sense of Community (SC-4)

Sense of Community in Rossland in 2011

What are we measuring?

An index of Rossland’s sense of community based on a series of survey questions regarding Rosslander’s sense of community, pride in Rossland, participation in Rossland events and sense of belonging in Rossland. The index utilized was based on the sense of community index utilized in the cities of Canmore and Calgary.

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator broadly attempts to measure the movement towards the Desired Future for the Sense of Community Focus Area and all of the Sense of Community End-state Goals. It focuses most on community members’ sense of the inclusivity and cohesion of Rossland, as well as their sense of community spirit and pride.

How are we doing?

The survey results indicate that 89% of Rossland residents agree completely (63%) or somewhat (26%) that there is a sense of community in Rossland. These results compare favourably to other communities. For example, 70% of Canmore residents agreed completely or somewhat that there is a sense of community in Canmore, and 95% of Fernie residents agreed completely or somewhat that there is a sense of community in Fernie.

Rossland residents also expressed a strong sense of community pride, satisfaction and belonging in Rossland. According to the survey, 93% of Rosslanders are proud to tell others where they live when they travel, 90% of Rosslanders feel they belong in Rossland, 91% of Rosslanders attend events and activities in Rossland and 94% of residents like living in Rossland.

The component of sense of community with the lowest score was with respect to whether it would take a lot for people to move from Rossland. Although this component still scored well, with 79% of respondents agreeing completely or somewhat that it would take them a lot to move from Rossland, at least 21% of respondents would consider moving. High property taxes and lack of seniors housing were common themes identified for considering a move from Rossland.  

The overall results were very positive, and many individuals emphasized that they love living in Rossland and feel a strong sense of connection to other Rossland residents. However, there were individuals who expressed dissatisfaction with Rossland’s sense of community, feeling that Rossland can be cliquey, does not do enough to engage seniors and youth, has changed into a resort town, and does not work well with other communities in the region. Only a small percentage of respondents raised these concerns. Nevertheless, they identify potential areas of work to improve Rossland’s overall sense of community.

There were some notable differences based on age and gender in the sense of community results. Across the board, women were much more likely to express strong agreement with all six of the components of sense of community with the exception of expressing pride in Rossland while they travel. In particular, women were substantially more likely to attend Rossland events and prefer to remain living in Rossland.

Satisfaction with living in Rossland, sense of community and expressing pride in Rossland while travelling all decline with age, but sense of belonging increases. Event attendance and inclination to move remain stable throughout the age groups.

 

Sense of Community Component Agree Completely Agree Somewhat Neither Agree nor Disagree Disagree Somewhat Disagree completely
There is a strong sense of community in Rossland 63% 26% 4% 5% 1%
I feel very much like I belong in Rossland 66% 23% 5% 4% 0%
I like living in Rossland 81% 13% 2% 3% 0%
When I travel I am proud to tell others where I live 84% 9% 5% 1% 0%
I attend community events and activities in Rossland 52% 39% 6% 2% 0%
It would take a lot for me to move from Rossland 50% 28%

10%

6%

6%

Sense of Community component scores in Rossland in 2011

Sense of Community by Age Group in 2011

Data Sources  

State of Rossland Survey

Energy and Air Quality

Desired Future

Rossland is a leader among small mountain communities in the generation and use of clean, renewable energy that fulfills a major portion of the community’s energy needs. Rossland’s diverse energy systems make the town energy self-sufficient and reduce harmful impacts on air, land, water, and the climate. The town conserves energy through an increasingly energy and resource efficient building stock, and residents generally get around by walking, cycling, and using public transit. The town maintains its carbon neutral status with the cooperation of residents and businesses who work to conserve energy in their daily lives and operations.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: The basic energy needs of residents, visitors, and businesses are met reliably, affordably, efficiently and equitably.

End-state Goal 2: The majority of the town’s total energy supply for transportation, electricity, and heating is derived from renewable sources that maximize the use of local energy sources.

End-state Goal 3: The transformation to carbon-neutral energy systems has provided a leading case study for small alpine communities in North America.

End-state Goal 4:  Every building meets or exceeds minimum standards for green buildings and a threshold for energy efficiency.

End-state Goal 5: Air quality is good and no minimum standards for air contaminants are exceeded. 

 

Energy Consumption (E-1)

Total annual and annual per capita electricity
consumption in Rossland from 2004 to 2009

What are we measuring?

Electricity and natural gas consumed by sector, total and per capita

Why are we measuring it?

The level of energy consumption and the type of energy consumed both impact the natural environment and are indicative of GHG emissions. While reducing GHG emissions is Rossland’s ultimate goal, we do not currently have the capacity to accurately track emissions. Currently Rossland does not have access to natural gas consumption data and is limited to electricity consumption data, which was provided by Fortis BC. Per capita energy consumption will be skewed by both annual variations in weather and visitor levels. While this indicator is not directly related to one of the End-state Goals in the Strategic Sustainability Plan, it does provide some sense of how Rossland is moving towards the desired future of conserving energy.

How are we doing?

Rossland’s overall electricity consumption has increased steadily since 2005. Rossland's residential electricity consumption has increased from 21,500 Mwh per year in 2005 to 24,714 Mwh per year in 2009. Commercial electricity consumption increased from 9,550 Mwh per year in 2005 to 10,139 Mwh per year in 2009. 

Rossland’s per capita energy consumption fluctuates slightly from 2004 to 2009. This may have been a result of annual weather variations (number of colder or warmer days), increases in population or fluctuations in visitor numbers. Unfortunately the data is not currently available to correct for these variables. The overall trend for electricity consumption however is up. Currently Rossland does not have access to natural gas consumption data.

Looking at electricity consumption on a household basis, one can see that Rosslanders consume more electricity than the provincial average. Residential electricity consumption per household has risen from 12,789 Kwh in 2005 to 14,924 Kwh in 2009. The average household in BC consumed 10,000 Kwh of electricity in 2010. This is likely in part related to climate and greater requirements for household heating.

 

Residential electricity consumption in Rossland from 2004 to 2009
 

Total

Residential (Kwh)

 

Per Household

(Kwh/household)

2004

21,446,260

12,951

2005

21,179,103

12,789

2006

21,560,311

13,020

2007

22,403,839

13,529

2008

22,920,166

13,841

2009

24,713,627

14,924

 

 

Data Sources

Fortis Inc.
 

Water and Solid Waste Management

Desired Future

The water resources in Rossland provide a dependable supply of clean, healthy water that exceeds quality requirements and meets the needs of residents, and visitors. Residents are active water custodians. Both the water and wastewater systems are sustainably managed to meet the needs of a growing community. Competing uses are balanced and natural hydrological systems as closely mimicked to meet natural ecosystem needs. Rossland is a leader in minimizing waste and maximizing recycling and reuse of resources and materials. Residents and businesses conserve resources in their daily activities.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: Existing reservoirs provide water of sufficient quality and quantity to service the needs of the town, and all activity occurring within the water supply catchment areas is undertaken in an environmentally sensitive manner that gives the highest priority to protecting water supplies and water quality.

End-state Goal 2: The water, wastewater and storm water systems adequately service residents, visitors and businesses and meet basic needs in a reliable, efficient, affordable and equitable manner.

End-state Goal 3: Potable water provision, storm water management and flood control measures are designed to maintain the integrity of streams, rivers, lakes, riparian areas and wetlands, while adequately servicing residents in a reliable, efficient and affordable manner.

End-state Goal 4: Water users are responsible citizens who conserve potable water and reserve the highest quality water for the uses demanding such quality.

End-state Goal 5: Recycling, reuse and reduction of materials has eliminated the need for a landfill and created local employment opportunities. 

 

Amount of Water Used (WW-1)

What are we measuring?

The estimated average daily domestic (residential) water use per capita served with municipal water

Why are we measuring it?

Rate of water consumption addresses both the sustainability-oriented conservation of natural resources and the reality that Rossland’s infrastructure is aging.  This indicator is in part reflective of End-state Goal #4 which states that water users are responsible citizens who conserve potable water and reserve the highest quality water for the uses demanding such quality.
Until all homes are metered, it is most accurate to report water usage from reservoir minus commercial water use. When community-wide meters have been installed, it will be possible to isolate most commercial water use. Red Mountain is metered separately from the rest of the community. Per capita calculations, however, will be skewed slightly by homes that are not occupied by “usual” residents included in the Census population estimates, and by homes that rely on well water.

How are we doing?

Over the last six years from 2004 to 2009, Rossland has utilized on average 878,355 cubic metres of water per year with a range of 815,903 in 2005 to 919,542 in 2007. Water consumption in Rossland remains stable for most of the year at about 2000 cubic metres per day, and then rises to 3500 to 5500 cubic metres per day in July and August.

Rossland’s water usage is high compared to other jurisdictions. Subtracting out an estimate for commercial water use, flow volumes from Rossland’s treatment plant suggest that from 2004 to 2009 average domestic use ranged from 394 to 550 litres per capita per day (lcd). This exceeds the national domestic use average of 329 lcd and the average domestic use of Europeans which ranges from 150 to 200 lcd. Nevertheless, Fernie’s per capita water consumption was 1,640 lcd in 2009. This is considered to be mostly as a result of leakage, but nonetheless provides a benchmark for another mountain community.

In the future, we will be able to refine this information using data from residential and commercial water meters.

 

Amount of Water Used 2004-2009
 

Total City Water Use

(cubic metres/year)

Per Capita Domestic Water Use

(litres/day)

2004

835,100

408.42

2005

815,903

394.00

2006

903,967

536.94

2007

919,542

549.96

2008

882,126

518.68

2009

913,492

489.99

Data Sources

City of Rossland
 

Reservoir Levels (WW-2)

What are we measuring?

Annual number of days either or both reservoirs are below full capacity

Why are we measuring it?

Reservoir levels will reflect Rossland’s current ability to meet the City’s water needs and reflects in part our progress towards End-state Goal #1: Existing reservoirs provide water of sufficient quality and quantity to service the needs of the town, and all activity occurring within the water supply catchment areas is undertaken in an environmentally sensitive manner that gives the highest priority to protecting water supplies and water quality.   

How are we doing?

Currently, Rossland has only baseline data for this indicator. In future iterations of this report, we will be able to report trends in this indicator as a baseline has been established. Star Gulch was 100% full or overflowing for all but nine days (mid July) in 2009. Ophir reservoir was still being commissioned and levels fluctuated due to operational issues rather than water demand or drought.

Data Sources

City of Rossland

Solid Waste (WW-3)

 

What are we measuring?

Per capita annual solid waste

Why are we measuring it?

Waste reduction is integral to Rossland’s sustainable future and a reduction in waste indirectly tracks Rossland’s progress toward End-state Goal #5: Recycling, reuse and reduction of materials has eliminated the need for a landfill and created local employment opportunities.  

Rossland residents are required to purchase special garbage bags to place their waste in for pick up. Currently the City is unable to track the weight of solid waste or the number of garbage bags collected. Until those numbers are available, the number of garbage bags sold will be used as indicator of the amount of garbage produced by Rossland.

How are we doing?

The number garbage bags sold in Rossland has increased from 2007 to 2009. Per capita garbage sold has increased from 8.6 large bags and 2.1 small bags per person in 2007 to 10 large bags and 3.2 small bags per person in 2009. This may in part be due to the removal of the self drop-off station. Although it appears that Rossland is producing more garbage, this collection system is relatively new and thus a few more years of data are required to observe a clear trend.  

 

Number of garbage bags sold per year in the City of Rossland

Year

Number of Large Bags

Number of Small Bags

Large Bags/person

Small Bags/person

2007

28540

7060

8.6

2.1

2008

33120

11200

9.5

3.2

2009

35250

11180

10

3.2

Data Sources  

Davies Sales and Service

Governance

Desired Future

Governance in Rossland is democratic, responsive, accountable, transparent and actively engages stakeholders and residents in collaborative decision-making processes. Planning and decision-making align with the community’s values and sustainability objectives. Rossland participates in local and regional government networks that exchange knowledge and resources and collaborate to meet shared objectives through efficient regional governance.

End-State Goals

End-state Goal 1: The governance processes are democratic, progressive, and efficient and decision-makers meaningfully engage stakeholders through a broad range of alternatives in transparent decision-making processes on all major civic initiatives.   

End-state Goal 2: Decision-making occurs within the larger context and framework of the community’s Strategic Sustainability Plan, with consideration given to community values, long-term consequences, and anticipated changes to regional and global conditions.

End-state Goal 3: Participation and collaboration with neighbouring communities is part of an effective regional system of governance geared towards meeting and supporting shared objectives.

End-state Goal 4: Civic buildings and community facilities provide spaces conducive to enjoyable and creative community discussion and citizen interaction.

 

Voter Turnout (G-1)

Voter participation in municipal elections 2009

What are we measuring?

Percent of registered voters participating in municipal elections

Why are we measuring it?

Voter turnout is considered a basic indicator of constituent engagement. Although it does not tell a story unto itself, it is a key part of the puzzle.  It is in part indicative of Rossland’s movement towards End-state Goal #1: The governance processes are democratic, progressive, and efficient and decision-makers meaningfully engage stakeholders through a broad range of alternatives in transparent decision-making processes on all major civic initiatives.

How are we doing?

Voter turnout in Rossland in the 2008 Municipal Election was 49%. This is substantially higher than the provincial average of 27% and the Trail turnout of 25%. Many other small British Columbia communities however, had comparable voter participation. Rossland participation has declined over 11% since the 2002 Municipal elections.
Voter-turnout suggests that Rossland is currently moving away from its goal of increasing community engagement in governance.

Voter participation in Rossland municipal elections 2002, 2005, 2008

Year

Percent Voter Participation in Rossland Municipal Elections

2002

60.5%

2005

55.0%

2008

49.0%

Data Sources  

City of Rossland data: City of Rossland

Other Municipalities and Provincial data: Civic Info

 

Satisfaction with Decision Input (G-2)

Satisfaction with Input into City Hall Decisions in 2011

What are we measuring?

Community members’ level of satisfaction with opportunities for input into City Hall decisions and activities

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator measures progress towards the achievement of End-state Goal #1 in which governance processes are democratic, progressive, and efficient and decision-makers meaningfully engage stakeholders through a broad range of alternatives in transparent decision-making processes.

How are we doing?

In total, 60% of Rosslanders had some level of satisfaction with their opportunities for input into decision-making in 2011. However only 21% of respondents were very satisfied with their opportunities for input into decision-making, while 39% were somewhat satisfied.

Satisfaction with opportunities for input into decisions was fairly stable across gender with women tending to be slightly more satisfied than men, who tended to be neither satisfied, nor dissatisfied.

The percentage of individuals very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with opportunities for input into City Hall decisions tended to be stable over age groups for all age groups over 25. Individuals age 45 to 54 expressed the highest degree of satisfaction with opportunities for input into City Hall decisions.

Individuals chose many ways to become involved in City Hall decisions. However while many have read about City Hall decisions (90%), only 49% have attended an open house, 48% have spoken to a Councillor, 26% have attended a Council meeting and 15% have written a letter to the City.

 

Approach

Percent of Individuals Employing Approach

Signing a Petition

58%

Attending an Open House

49%

Talking to a Councillor

48%

Writing a Letter to the Editor

9%

Attending a Council Meeting

26%

Writing a Letter to the City

15%

Approaches to Participating in City Hall Decisions in 2011

Common themes in the comments suggested that some residents felt that there is no point in trying to provide input as City Hall will disregard the input. However others countered that there are multiple opportunities for input into City Hall decisions and activities and that it is the responsibility of residents to take advantage of them.

This is baseline data. In future iterations of the State of Rossland report in which a survey is undertaken, we should be able to report on trends for this indicator.

Data Sources  

State of Rossland Survey

Satisfaction with Information Quality (G-3)

Satisfaction with Accuracy of Information from City Hall by Age Group in 2011

What are we measuring?

Community members’ level of satisfaction with the accuracy, timeliness and completeness of reported information regarding City Hall decisions and activities

Why are we measuring it?

This indicator measures progress towards the achievement of End-state Goal #1 in which governance processes are democratic, progressive, and efficient and decision-makers meaningfully engage stakeholders through a broad range of alternatives in transparent decision-making processes.

How are we doing?

Satisfaction with the timeliness, completeness and accuracy of information from City Hall tend to be linked with the same patterns of responses for all three across gender and age groups. Overall, only 22% of Rosslanders rate themselves as being very satisfied with the timeliness, completeness and accuracy of information from City Hall, while 39% are somewhat satisfied with the timeliness and completeness of information from City Hall and only 33% are somewhat satisfied with the accuracy of information from City Hall. A large portion of respondents (between 25 and 27%) were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the information from City Hall.

 

 

Very Satisfied

Somewhat Satisfied

Neither Satisfied nor Dissatisfied

Somewhat Dissatisfied

Very Dissatisfied

Accuracy of Information

22%

39%

27%

5%

2%

Timeliness of Information

21%

39%

25%

8%

1%

Completeness of Information

21%

33%

26%

10%

3%

Satisfaction with the Accuracy, Timeliness and Completeness of information from City Hall in 2011

There were few gender differences among the responses. Men and women are equally likely to be very satisfied with the timeliness, completeness and accuracy of the information from City Hall. However women are slightly more likely to express that they are somewhat satisfied or neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, while men are more likely to indicate that they are somewhat dissatisfied with the timeliness, completeness and accuracy of the information from City Hall.

Across age groups, respondents under 44 were more likely to indicate that they were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied with the timeliness, accuracy and completeness of information from City Hall, while those over 44 were more likely to indicate that they are somewhat satisfied with information from City Hall. Individuals in the 45 to 54 age group are mostly likely to be very satisfied with the timeliness, accuracy and completeness of information from City Hall.

Very few individuals expressed strong dissatisfaction with the information from City Hall (3%). Common themes in the comments were that the information is available for those that want to access it. However concerns were expressed that residents have no way of knowing what information is not being communicated.  

This is baseline data. In future iterations of the State of Rossland report in which a survey is undertaken, we should be able to report on trends for this indicator.

Data Sources  

State of Rossland Survey